Do Christians And Three Legged Dogs Go To Hell?

The man over the bridge has 16 dogs. He used to have 16 3/4 dogs but the old three legged one that used to lag behind the others has gone to doggy heaven. Do three legged dogs get their other leg back when they go to heaven? I’d like to think they do. I have no idea how he lost the limb in question but I’m sure it wasn’t his fault. But now I’m assuming he’s going to heaven. What if he’s going to doggy hell?

If such a place exists that is. A lot of people don’t believe in hell. I’ll take that a step further. A lot of people who profess to be Christians don’t believe in hell. Or at least their behaviour indicates that they don’t. Others smile knowingly and tell us not to worry about such matters. Jesus loves us and we are going to heaven and anyway it’s all symbolism and allegory right? A bit like the Garden of Eden and that big boat that Noah supposedly built.

My biggest problem with hell is that I believe in it. I often wish I didn’t. Life would be so much easier if I wasn’t fretting over death all of the time. I could do and say what I wanted without having to worry about consequences and repercussions. I sometimes feel like the ‘ghost’ at the end of a Scooby Doo episode when they are unmasked to reveal that it was kindly old Curtis the Caretaker all along.

And I would have gotten away with it if wasn’t for that pesky Hell.

Thinking about hell all the time and the distinct possibility that I might end up there does have its benefits. For a start I reckon Jesus would be proud of me as he spoke about hell more than any other subject during his missionary on earth. Which is all the more startling because many church leaders rarely mention it. All that hell stuff isn’t good for morale in ‘church land’ where everything is wonderful and nobody ever has any problems.

So if it’s good enough for Jesus then it’s good enough for me. He didn’t pull any punches either, painting a vivid, graphic picture of what we could (not) look forward too if that was to be our final destination. Anyone with even the most sketchy knowledge of the Bible can’t turn around and say they weren’t warned. It is as vivid and visceral as the story of the Cross. Jesus can be a real party pooper at times.

Hell is the ultimate style cramper. How am I supposed to live the life I want to live with all these rules and restrictions holding me back? Isn’t being a Christian meant to be about freedom and not having to worry? Well I did all that yet I don’t feel particularly liberated and I fret more than ever. Hell is the ultimate life beyond life sentence. It is the dark cloud on the horizon of all my good intentions. I can hear it, taste it, almost touch it. It’s coming for me.

But there we have the nub of it. Hell exists for a reason. Hell is love. Because Jesus doesn’t want us to go there. So he laid it on thick and told us how it really was. Like one of those anti smoking campaigns where they show terminal cancer patients talking about their nicotine habits. Ignoring Hell is choosing to live your life how you want to. Accepting Hell is an opportunity to live life the way you were meant to.

I believe in Hell. I don’t know where it is or what it looks like and I sincerely hope I never find out. I want to go to the other place where there are bottomless bottles of Diet Coke and you can eat honeycomb ice cream all day long without having to run ten miles afterwards to burn it off. I want to take that three legged dog for walks and not have to worry about worrying all the time. Hell gives me that opportunity. Hell is freedom. Hell is grace. Hell is truth.

Woooaaaaah!! That was a serious one, Stephen. Bring back the running and writing posts. All is forgiven.

What are your thoughts on Hell?

62 thoughts on “Do Christians And Three Legged Dogs Go To Hell?

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  1. I was taught a different definition of after-living punishments than yours, so have enjoyed (?) a less-strict internal battle regarding my sins or shortcomings.
    I hadn’t considered that before reading this post of your’n, so thanks.
    Basically, the main, applicable thing I was taught was that hell by your definition (brimstone, eternal punishment, etc.) is only for the very worst of sinners. Even Hitler might not end up there after judgment.

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              1. *Ahem* “…the average person will replenish the lost VOLUME [of blood] within 24-48 hours (depending on rate of post-donation fluid intake), but it takes around eight weeks for the donor’s body to replenish all of the formed elements (erythrocytes, leukocytes, and platelets) lost…”

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  2. I have a new admiration for you. This was quite possibly the bravest blog post I’ve ever read!

    I am speechless when those who say they’re Christians don’t believe hell…I sometimes stop and ask, “You’ve read the Bible…right?!?” Yet they wouldn’t dream of sharing heaven with a person whose made a living off exploiting children.

    “Sorry sir, you can’t have it both ways…”

    If there truly wasn’t a hell, the cross was pointless. Faith at all would be pointless! Hell SHOULD scare us. And I used to worry about not really being saved ALL the time. It drove me to becoming extremely performance driven and then being filled with condemnation every time I messed up. But reading this verse changed that all for me one day: “The Spirit Himself testifies with our spirit that we are children of God” Romans 8:16

    I may not know where I stand in the righteousness order…but I KNOW my relationship with God, and I am his child.
    I have so much peace in that!

    Liked by 4 people

  3. Okay, the answer to the question is Yes. Everyone who dies goes to Hell. The biblical hell not a place of torment.

    Using an interlinear we can see Jesus was in hell for parts of three days. Therefore we have to ask is the Hell the Church teaches the same as the hell the bible teaches and that is a very different question.

    The hard yards on this subject were done by Bible scholars in the second part of the 1700’s through to the early 1900’s.

    Whoever we were when we die we go to hell. The parable in graphic terms told by Jesus – the rich man and Lazarus – is not a literal place rather it explained something about the nation of Israel.

    Not going to get too heavy but the research is really worth the effort. It liberates our thinking and frees our Christianity to be an expression of our love for God through Christ.

    Really enjoyed reading this post.

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    1. Not a place of torment? I’ve personally never heard this view…hmm maybe reading different bibles?

      If it is the Christian Bible you’re referring to, I’m curious to hear what you feel about passages like Lazarus being in torment and begging Abraham to warn his brothers. Or about the many verses that say “There will be weeping and nashing of teeth”? Or what do you do with the “Lake of Burning sulfur” mentioned in Revelation. Or in Mark where it talks about the “worm that eats them does not die and their fire is not quenched.” Sounds like a terrible place to me!

      Please read this comment coming from a curious tone, not a harsh “I know better” one! It’s intriguing to me how different people interpret the same verses in opposite ways!

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Hi, I never read anything as harsh or unfair. People don’t always agree but the evidence begins with the God’s word to Adam in Genesis 3: 19 then we need to look at Ecclesiates 9: 10. Genesis and Job establish that good people go to hell so the next question for me was “what is the hell in bible?” If everyone goes there good and bad? Simple answer came from examining the Hebrew word for Hell, Sheol.
        What does the NT teach? Romans 6:7 when we die we are acquitted of our sins. I explored many more references and reread the Rich Man and Lazarus.
        The lake of fire is different from hell as we note in Revelation 20:13 as hell delivered up the dead in them, and hell is destroyed in the lake of fire.
        So from that description we can see that hell needs further research. So I will put something in my blog about each part.
        I enjoy good discussions about the bible and doctrine, Hell, the trinity, infallibility etc., Thank you for reading my response and asking the question.

        Liked by 2 people

        1. Thanks for your response! Will check out your post. One thing I agree on is this: God is completely just, nothing he does is unfair. So whatever hell is like, we can know that no one who doesn’t belong there will go there.

          Liked by 1 person

    2. Sorry, I posted my comment before proof reading it! I meant if you could further expand on what the story of the rich man and Lazarus means about Israel. I realize you already referred to it, I just was curious for you to expand on what you figured Jesus was speaking about.

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  4. I’m in the process of figuring out my faith. Is there a hell? I’m not sure. I was taught there was. and deep down, I still fear it.

    Oddly enough, I’ve read 2 blog posts today and both were about hell. One was a post about a devout Christian who comes to realize there is no hell. And then yours. Not sure what God’s trying to tell me! I need a tie breaker. Lol

    It is hard to believe that God would even allow a hell. Isn’t he God? Why not just destroy hell? I don’t know. The Bible makes so little sense to me these days.

    Nonetheless, great post as usual. I like a little serious mixed in with the lighter stuff.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. I once asked my former pastor Kevin about dogs and heaven. His response Jesus didn’t die on the cross for dogs so he didn’t know. He was of no help. Hahahaha. I hope there are dogs and they all have four legs.

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  6. I believe hell is real. Some Christians ignore that fact, and I’m not sure why. We have been forgiven, and it is our job to help others to be forgiven.
    Actually, in our study of Heaven by Randy Alcorn, we learned that it is implied in the Bible that animals will be present in heaven! Maybe not our same pets who have died, but animals all the same. It’ll be cool to see, don’t you think?

    Liked by 2 people

            1. Sometimes I’m more certain than others. I have doubts. It’s the reason I started writing. To share and explore those doubts and learn from others. I learn from young and old. You and your mum for example. Not that she’s old by the way 😬

              Liked by 1 person

  7. In Hinduism is kind of different. Hell is a state of mind where you know or you have done wrong to others. It’s just that every action has a equal and opposite reaction. Do bad and hell is not away. But our Gods often try to steer us in the right direction.
    Love your blog though. It is something new.

    Liked by 1 person

  8. Hell is never intended for humanity. It is made for the devil and his minions, but due to our sinfall nature and us being easily deceived it became a part of our lives. That’s the exact reason why the Father sent His Son Jesus Christ to keep us from going there. He made a way by the death of His Son to break Satan’s curse. Now, why would you pick hell? That I don’t understand, since there’s already a way out.

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  9. Loved the theological bent to this one. Yup, I believe in hell because Jesus said it was real. Scripture says God is “not willing that any should perish, but that all should come to repentance” (2 Peter 3:9). So God does not desire that anyone should end up in hell, but that all should believe in his Son’s death and resurrection.

    Liked by 1 person

  10. I used to believe in a firey hell
    I now believe it is here on Earth.
    I do not agree that that is what Jesus talked about most

    If I tell my child they have free will to make a decision and then they dare to not pick what I wanted so I threw them into a fire…. ARGH… That us NOT freedom. That us torture and bullying.

    You asked.
    Look up gahenna(can’t spell) it is a garbage pit.

    Liked by 1 person

  11. This post reminded me of all those times that I too wish I didn’t believe in such a place as Hell. Sometimes I think I’m really missing out on all life has to offer or that life would be easier if I wasn’t always worrying about the consequences both in this life and the next. Then I think about all the times my friends have told me that they’re jealous that I haven’t experienced some of the bad decisions that they’ve made even though it is what everyone else expects. I’ve been blessed and protected in many ways because of this darn thing called a conscience that keeps reminding me about Hell. By God’s grace, I no longer worry about going there personally because I also believe that through Christ’s sacrifice I’ve been redeemed from that well-deserved judgment but it also devastates me because the vast majority of my friends are still on that road. It is harder sometimes to see the balance between banging your beliefs over someone’s head and begging them to be apart of what you have already experienced! I would wish Hell on no one but I have no power to save 😦 only Christ has that and so many I love will never believe 😦

    Liked by 1 person

  12. You make an important point implicitly. If there were no consequences for doing whatever we want, the world would be an awful place to live. There would be gross injustice and nothing to say about it because that would just be the way ti is. It is difficult to imagine Hitler, Stalin, and many many others wanting there to be god and if there is one who is Love, would they really want him? I doubt it. Hell is about choosing to run your own life by choosing something other than God. I wouldn’t want to be married to a woman I “forced” to love me, no matter how much I might love her. The fact that Jesus loves everyone does not mean that they all do or would love him. So there is an alternative. I dn’t know what Hell is like or how it works but I believe it is really the alternative for those who commit idolatry. I don’t mean simply bowing down to a physical statue. I mean giving first place or allegiance to anything before God. That might be reputation, sexual desire, thirst for power or wealth, or any number of things that I choose to be my god, which implicitly means that I am making myself God. I wonder to what extent rejection of belief in Hell reflects Voltaire’s famous quip: “God made man in his image and we have returned the favor.” We want to live with no consequences but the universe does not work that way and if you were a woman who was raped or sold in sexual slavery, or someone who lost a limb to a drunk driver or lost a son or daughter to a car bomb, do you really want there to be no distinction between the perpetrator and the victim? That’s reality without Hell.

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  13. Oooh golly Stephen! I’m probably not the best to come to because I’m not awfully religious… as in it was a while since I went to church. So from a not very often church-goer here’s my view. I like to think that I BEHAVE like a Christian and try to always be kind and think of others. I believe in heaven – I believe I shall meet with my parents again (just run with that and don’t try to tell me otherwise) and finally I believe in Karma as in … what goes around comes around. Oh and I don’t exactly believe in Hell, but I do believe that the bad people in life won’t follow (hopefully me) into heaven. Whether or not they get reincarnated as slugs or something I know not, but I do believe that they will no longer bother us. Katie

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  14. Interesting comments. One thing I noticed is most are saying what they do or do not believe. But if there is a hell it does not matter what we as an individual believe or do not believe. One may choose not to believe the Bible, but if one says the Bible is true, then one can’t reject the belief in hell simply because it doesn’t fit with what one wants. It’s kind of like people saying they don’t believe Jesus is God but they believe he was a good man or a good teacher.. Certainly a person can reject the belief that Jesus is God. But then they cannot call him good. He was either God or a liar or a lunatic (because of all the claims he made about himself and belief in him.

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  15. Yes, I believe in Heaven and Hell, but I also believe we are in hell now, and how we act and react is what decided whether we live in eternal hell after passing or if we get a pass to heaven. We can live life to the fullest and be the best version of self, or we can wallow in the victim role and be miserable and angry. I chose to be the best version of self, treat all people like I want to be treated, advocate for those who cannot do it for themselves, and just be a good person, even in chaos and crisis.

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      1. I was born and raised Catholic, but after my sons best friend committed suicide because of a priest I gave up religion. However, I do believe in God, and I witnessed it through the death and dying process with my dad for 19-days. My dad wasn’t ready, and he kept closing the door to heaven, and God told him he would have to open the door on Tuesday, December 6, 2011, and he passed away on that day. God also told him that Life is ”hell” to teach us lessons to be better angels. My great niece was 14 months old when he passed, and he was so afraid she would forget him, and today she still sees him and he talks to her. I believe his death was to be her guardian angel because she needed protection.

        I have a very good friend who sends me Bible versus daily to help me in my faith and what I lost years ago.

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