God Remembers – Part One

Zacharias prayed every day. Which wasn’t peculiar, in itself, given his status as a high ranking priest within the order of Abijah. He was a man of some status, a descendant of Aaron, who had devoted his life to serving God. He was respected by the people, a man viewed as righteous and blameless in the eyes of God. He was humble, preferring to live a modest life in the city of Hebron, as opposed to the more glamorous surroundings of Jerusalem or Jericho.

Zacharias did everything by the book. He married the daughter of a fellow priest, as was expected of a man of his standing. Her name was Elizabeth, a God fearing and obedient woman who shared her husband’s righteous ways. He served for two weeks of the year in the temple, as was required of him, performing the relevant ceremonial duties. On the surface, he and his wife led exemplary lives.

Or did they? You see there was something not quite right about them, for they had no children. Which, in first century Palestine, was a social no no. A childless marriage was viewed as something as a social pariah. Many thought such couples had offended God and were being punished accordingly. What shameful secret were they hiding beneath their perfect lives to have merited the wrath of God?

Zacharias would have been well within his rights to divorce Elizabeth, given she was unable to bear him a son, to continue the family lineage. Nobody would have batted an eyelid had he ‘traded her in’ for a younger wife who would have given him the family befitting of a man who walked in such close alignment with God. Yet Zacharias did not. Why? Well, because he loved Elizabeth of course.

Instead he prayed. Day after day, month after month, year after year. For a family, a son. But now, as they entered their sixties, it appeared that boat had sailed. There was no child, and his prayers remained unanswered. People still gossiped and whispered behind their backs about the honourable priest and his childless wife. Zacharias could have turned his back on it all, his faith and his wife. But he didn’t. Instead he continued to love Elizabeth, pray diligently and serve at the temple.

Today was no ordinary day. No, it was the Day of Atonement, the holiest day in the Jewish calendar. The day, when the nation of Israel offered up prayers of repentance and forgiveness. A very special day. And the most important part of the day was when a hand picked priest would enter the inner sanctum of the temple, the ‘Holy of Holies’. Today, that priest was Zacharias, the childless priest from the barren Judean Mountains.

His job? To carry a fire censer, laden with coals taken from the altar, into the ‘Holy of Holies’ which contained the Ark of the Covenant itself. Zacharias would stand in the presence of God and sprinkle incense on the coals and waft them, allowing a pleasing aroma to rise up to Heaven. It symbolised the prayers of the people, the hopes of a nation. It was most likely the pinnacle of his priestly career.

I’m sure he must have been nervous. His hands were probably shaking as he moved the fire censer from side to side, every last iota of his concentration focused on this most prestigious task. Outside the prayers of thousands of worshippers were rising in volume and intensity. The ceremony was reaching a crescendo and Zacharias stood at the centre of it all. It didn’t get much bigger than this.

Then it ended. He sighed with relief, mouthed a silent prayer of thanks that he hadn’t fluffed his lines, and exited the holy place. The greatest day of his life had peaked. He could relax now, rest and prepare for the long journey home to Hebron. Except it wasn’t. It wasn’t anywhere near over. For God had other plans for Zacharias. The old man who had given his life to God was about to embark on a new adventure; a life he thought was meandering to a mundane end.

Waiting for Zacharias outside was an angel. A most senior angel, as it happens, by the name of Gabriel. Who had a message for the elderly man of God which was going to turn his world upside down. God had been listening to his prayers and now was the time to reveal the plan he had been preparing all along for Zacharias and Elizabeth. For they were to have a son. A very special son. Who would be the spark that would set the known world on fire.

To be continued….

Zacharias – the Greek spelling of Zachariah, meaning ‘The Lord has remembered.’

You can read the story of Zacharias and Elizabeth in Luke Chapter 1.

Do you feel life has passed you by?

That God hasn’t heard your prayers?

Don’t give up hope. God remembers. But we must also remember him.

16 thoughts on “God Remembers – Part One

Add yours

  1. Awesome! I read the first chapter of Luke as well. Pretty wild! Being struck speechless and ‘dumb’ lol… Sounds like what happened to me during my accident. For two weeks, I had no idea where I was lol because of my concussion.

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  2. “Which, in first century Palestine, was a social no no. A childless marriage was viewed as something as a social pariah.”

    This strikes me as somewhat strange, given the pivotal role of patriarch Abraham and Sarah. I realize the promise of a multitude of offspring more numerous than sand and stars was part of the promise. Mosaic law likewise promised blessings on crops, kids and cattle.

    Still, a negative stigma surrounding infertility is a tad tough to wrap one’s head around, given Abraham and Sarah.

    But then, perhaps God grants an echo through the ages herein Zacharias and Elizabeth’s plight. They are a sort of second Abraham, called to hail the fulfillment of Abrahamic covenant in Christ. In Abraham’s Seed, all nations shall be blessed.

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      1. Society was known to fall and lay heavy on judgment, as well as misunderstand. I think people look at Abraham now as the line of Israel, but originally it started with infertility. God saw what He could do. But people, often struggling with faith anyways, only see what is in front of them. I think this may be why the stigma existed back in the day.

        Liked by 1 person

  3. I love the angle you chose for this story! We’ve been doing a study of Biblical culture in school, and a lot of the things you said were things we had learned, like how not having children was such a bad thing. Really interesting! Great job!

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  4. Thank you for the reminder. 🙂 And I love the way you’ve told this; I can’t always “follow” how things are written in The Bible, but you make it so wonderfully easy (and enjoyable). I’m looking forward to reading [much!] more.

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  5. On a practical note, I wonder if the words “fire censer” would be translated into a thurible today. Oh, I do miss reading Mum’s Biblical Archaeology.

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